Author: Melissa Edge

Why the National Endowment for the Humanities matters

Editor: Here in Alabama we care deeply about our heritage. We celebrate our culture, and we know that to be worthy of our future we must honor the best of our past. This is why it troubles us that the National Endowment for the Humanities has been slated for elimination. The NEH, which supports museums, archives, libraries, colleges and universities, favors projects that reach the widest possible public for widest possible impact. For example, NEH funding has supported scholars across the country in putting presidential papers online. Thanks to NEH, educators here in Mobile and throughout Alabama can share with our students material that was once packed away in dusty boxes, accessible only to experts. In addition to preserving our American heritage, the NEH helps expand our knowledge of regions of the world vital to U.S. interests. For example, University of South Alabama scholars with the Center for the Study of War and Memory have asked the NEH to fund a project to translate and publish key documents of Russian military history that give Americans and policymakers critical context for understanding Russian military thinking today.  Some have asked, “Why should the American people pay for the NEH?” We would answer that we have a duty to the past to preserve our heritage and a duty to the future to teach our children about our history and culture. Moreover, it...

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The Protest That Wasn’t

To the editor: On Jan. 21, I went to the March for Human Rights in Mobile. As a “sister march” to the Women’s March on Washington, it was organized in three days by a Spring Hill College student. I kind of wanted to go and kind of didn’t. I’m so weary of the angry rhetoric in light of the recent election and really didn’t want to hear any more. I waffled all morning and made up my mind not to go. Instead, I tuned into the Facebook Live broadcast of the Washington March. It looked so exciting. But this is Mobile. A woman who appeared to be about my age was carrying a placard that read “I Can’t Believe I Still Have To Protest This Sh*t.” As a child of the ‘60s I marched for civil rights and for women’s rights. And yes, it appears that I do still have to protest this sh*t. So, I put on my “already been worn yesterday” T-shirt that says “Hate Won’t Win” and folded a pink bandana into a headband (having sent my three cute little knitted pink “pussycat hats” to be worn in marches in Washington and Eugene) and went to protest. But it didn’t feel like a protest. No flags were burned. No bottles were thrown. No cops were hassled. It felt like … love. The press labeled the March...

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Uncontrolled growth stresses us all

Editor: I would like to offer another point of view concerning Jane Nicholes’ article about subdivisions springing up all over the Eastern Shore (Jan. 19). I wished that another point of view was offered to the uncontrolled growth being allowed in Baldwin County. The only points of view given were those people who had real estate interests and politicians in power who are connected to real estate interests. Yes, I know that if there is no growth, the area will stagnate and die. I also know that uncontrolled growth not only causes traffic jams, more crime, more taxes and a collapse of the quality of life in Baldwin County. A balance of both extremes is needed — but I think the developers want, pay for and get the other extreme. Why is it that politicians in the city and county governments call for tax increases when more people move in the area? I thought the additional people would bring in the additional needed taxes. But according to what I read, the politicians want more people to pay even more taxes. They always use the schools as the “tax hostage.” As population rises linearly, taxes rise exponentially. If I am incorrect, people living in New York and California would be paying the lowest taxes in the nation. Already the sewage capacity of the utilities are topped out and the overcrowded...

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Lagniappe: December 15 – December 21, 2016

The Dec. 15-21 issue of Lagniappe asks whether — in the wake of the demolition of the Key Loan building last month — several other historic properties downtown listed as being “in peril” should be restored or demolished and reconstructed. The former building at 522 Dauphin St. was one of several downtown that is essentially a shell, waiting for investment for redevelopment. In Bay Briefs, we explain why the new Mobile County Recycling Center is losing money. We have have a story about Fairhope’s Christmas lights problem. There’s also a story out of Chickasaw about why former Chieftains football...

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Music Listings: December 15 – 21, 2016

THUR. DEC 15 Bluegill— Jeff Johnson Duo Blues Tavern— Al McNab & Friends, 8:30p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Callaghan’s— Flow Tribe Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Fairhope Brewing— Bluegrass Jam Felix’s— Soulshine Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 1p// Mark Sherrill, John Joiner, Chris Newbury, 5p/// Jay Williams Duo, 9:15p Listening Room— Lisa Mills Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newll McSharry’s— The Lite Traveler’s, 7:30p Saenger— Holiday Movie: Scrooged Veets— The Family Jewels, 8p Wind Creek Casino— Rexton Lee, 8p FRI. DEC 16 All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Big Beach Brewing— Southern Fried Voodoo, 6p Bluegill—...

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