Band: Kinky Friedman, Will Kimbrough
When: Sunday, Feb. 7, at 2 p.m.
Venue: The Frog Pond at Blue Moon Farm, www.thefrogpondatbluemoonfarm.com
For Tickets Visit venue website for more info

While revelers celebrate misrule in the streets of Mobile, Kinky Friedman will bring his own brand of musical and political misrule to The Frog Pond. This songwriter/author/outspoken political enthusiast will be traveling to Silverhill to promote his latest album, “The Loneliest Man I Ever Met.”

With deep, memorable songs that include the offbeat single “Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis,” Friedman’s performance at The Frog Pond will include his raw brand of country and his hilarious yet insightful commentary on the state of the world. Lagniappe caught up with Friedman to talk about his two passions: music and politics.

STEPHEN CENTANNI: This isn’t your first visit to Blue Moon Farm. What was it about your initial visit that made you want to come back?

KINKY FRIEDMAN: Mostly it’s the new CD, “The Loneliest Man I Ever Met.” That thing is really kind of like oatmeal. It sticks to people.

It’s very different from what you hear on the radio today coming out of Nashville, for instance, which is background music for frat parties. It’s overproduced, and it’s been overproduced for decades.

C: Saying that and being from Austin, it seems like you’re carrying on the philosophy that originally built the Austin music scene. What do you think about the modern Austin scene?

F: I call Austin “Dallas with Guitars.” The place has gotten so big, and the traffic. The kind of people coming into Austin are different from what was there, which is not surprising. There’s a sh*tload of talent in Nashville, I mean, in Austin. Well, there probably is in Nashville too, somewhere, but you wouldn’t know it. I went to Nashville with Willie (Nelson) about a year ago. I was being nostalgic about Nashville, but what comes out of it is not very good. What I’m trying to say is that “The Loneliest Man I Ever Met” was a “Redheaded Stranger”-type of recording. It’s very sparse, and we got really great musicians on it like Mickey Raphael, Willie’s harp player, and guitarist Joe Cerati from New Jersey.

That makes the record. That’s why it sounds different from anything else I’ve done. It gives you time to think. You can bring your imagination when you listen to something like “Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis.” You’ve got, really, a song about most of us. Much of the record is like that. There’s songs on there that you would never record today, like “Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square,” which is a World War II-style song. You would not think that it would be trending anywhere in America today.

The record has done really, really well. It’s not only been a financial pleasure, but it’s selling differently. It doesn’t fall off a cliff. What I’m saying is that we have cultural ADD these days. So, you got a hit movie or a hit record. The next week, you can’t even find it on the charts anywhere. That tells us more about ourselves than the record.

C: With that said, how do you think that problem can be fixed?

F: Well, that’s a really good question. I think our sh*t is fucked up, as Warren Zevon observed. Warren was describing his own situation. He was dying of cancer, but really, it’s a good description of our country and the world. So much is wrong, and it’s so deep it may not be fixable this time.

I think that’s why when we play this country (music), the audience responds well to “My Shit’s Fucked Up” and “Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis.” Some of them are laughing at the beginning, but they’re not at the end. They understand those songs.

It’s just an unfortunate situation, and I don’t know what the cure is. Our sh*t is f*cked up in Washington, and it’s f*cked up in Nashville, and it’s f*cked up in Hollywood and everywhere in between. So, how do we fix it? I don’t really have the answer. Someone else is gonna have to come up with that, or the pendulum is going to have to swing back toward America.

C: You are no stranger to the political arena. Hunter S. Thompson said that politics is “better than sex.” It was an obsession for him. What’s your fascination with politics?

F: My definition of politics is that “poly” means more than one and “ticks” are blood-sucking parasites. What we have is that we don’t have a Nelson Mandela in sight, do we? We don’t have a Winston Churchill or an Abraham Lincoln or an FDR. We don’t have anybody.

That’s why Willie and I discovered last week that we’re both supporting Bernie (Sanders). It’s the first time we’ve been on the same page politically, because Willie is usually left of God. I’m supporting Bernie because I wanna see a Jeeeeeeewww (falsetto voice) in the White House. Also, I have observed that if Bernie wins this thing, then it’ll be the first time that a Jewish family has moved into a place that a black family has moved out of. That would be interesting.

In general, Hillary, who I once supported, is really an empty pantsuit following in the trail of Obama, who turned out to be the Forrest Gump of all presidents. The man just can’t make a decision. I can’t either, but when he does it, bad things start happening around the world. Most of this has to be laid at his door and people like him.

(German Chancellor) Angela Merkel has really screwed up in this German situation. Having just played Germany this year, those audiences are wonderful. I always said that Germans were my second favorite people and my first is everybody else. I’m the new David Hasselhoff of Europe. I’m the thinking man’s David Hasselhoff.

The German audiences just about sold out the 16 shows I did in Germany. They’re all young people. You know who they like? They like who you mentioned. They like Hunter Thompson. They like Gram Parsons. They like Shel Silverstein, Tom Waits, Iggy Pop, Van Dyke Parks, and they like the Kinkster. They get it. They don’t just like me. I mean, they’ve read my books in German, and they know every lyric to every song. They’re great audiences, as opposed to some American from New Jersey going in his flip-flops and paying $400 to see Céline Dion.

We just don’t care. America has a problem. Part of it is cultural ADD, and part of it is political correctness. We used to call Mexicans “Greasers.” Now, we call them “Lubricanos.” That’s one of my best lines on stage, actually. That’s the truth. That’s what’s happened. That’s why Trump has a candidacy.