Each Wednesday night, Callaghan’s features the delightfully Southern sounds of Deluxe Trio. However, those who decide to sample the sounds of Deluxe Trio on Wed., Oct. 15 will also get another treat. Los Angeles-based author Scott B. Bomar will present his book “Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock” (available at Bienville Books).

Author Scott B. Bomar (above) will be at Callaghan’s Oct. 15 to discuss his book “Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock.” The book is a visual profile of the musicians, producers, record labels and movers and shakers that defined the genre.

Author Scott B. Bomar (above) will be at Callaghan’s Oct. 15 to discuss his book “Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock.” The book is a visual profile of the musicians, producers, record labels and movers and shakers that defined the genre.

Bomar will not only be reading from his book, but he will also be signing copies and holding a Q&A session.

In the late ‘80s, Bomar was a teen growing up in Nashville. During the time, radio was filled with synth-based new wave sounds definitive of the era. However, Bomar was drawn to more guitar-oriented rock. Bomar satisfied his craving with his father’s extensive vinyl collection and classic rock radio stations such as WGFX 104.5.

These outlets introduced the young Bomar to Southern rock bands such as the Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Marshall Tucker Band and Wet Willie. This led Bomar to enter a “gateway into embracing the music of the past,” which included his exploration of R&B, blues, country and early rock ‘n’ roll. In a time without the Internet, he furthered his musical journey with illustrated books covering Southern rock and its musical roots. These highly visual books served as the inspiration of “Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock.”

“In a way, my book is sort of a throwback to that era,” Bomar said. “Even the layout and design have a bit of that retro feel, which helps pull the reader into that whole experience. I wanted to present a full history that focuses on the obvious bands like Skynyrd and the Allmans, but it also delves into groups like the Atlanta Rhythm Section, Black Oak Arkansas or the Outlaws, and even beyond to more obscure groups such as Grinderswitch and Hydra.”

Bomar hopes that his readers will experience many things through his book. First, he hopes to create wider interest in a genre he feels has been “overlooked or not given as much credit as it deserves.” He also hopes to dispel the stereotype of the genre as “ignorant, backward redneck music.” Finally, Bomar desires for his book to shed a fresh light on a musical genre that deserves more credit than it has received.

Bomar also thinks that one aspect of “Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock” will be quite appealing to Mobilians.

“I think the folks in Mobile will particularly enjoy the chapter on Wet Willie, which came out of Mobile in the early 1970s with their no-frills full-on rock-and-roll-swagger to become one of the great bands of the era.”